How Long Will I Struggle with Alcoholism?

How Long Will I Struggle with Alcoholism?

Alcoholism can have a major, lasting impact on how your brain and body works, which causes changes that impact your emotional and physical well-beings and how you behave. Recovering from the affects of alcoholism is a challenge, one that can take many years to overcome. At the beginning of the road to recovery, it can seem impossible to escape the grip alcohol has over your life, but with time and dedication, even the most severe cases of alcoholism have a chance for recovery and a sober life.

Alcoholism involves a physical dependency on alcohol that can be one of the hardest things to overcome since it involves changes to the brain’s chemistry that leads to severe cravings when a person stops or drinks less alcohol. In cases of heavy alcohol abuse, this can lead to permanent neurological damage if the use is long term. If an alcoholic becomes sober and stays sober, over time, the cravings they experience for alcohol will gradually fade and become less intense, until they’re hardly a factor in recovery. When your body isn’t swimming in alcohol, your brain will have a chance to try to repair some of that neurological damage, which helps your cravings decrease faster.

The psychological triggers for alcohol cravings are another matter. They can create powerful cravings brought on by events or situations that provoke a recovery alcoholic. It’s common for these outside triggers, usually associated with strong memories or emotions from times of alcohol use, to linger over time, whereas the physical cravings may fade away. It’s important to learn ways to overcome not only those physical cravings, but the things you can’t control on your own, and it can be a continual struggle to resist the urge to drink.

Alcoholism is often a lifelong struggle that some may never fully recover from. It can have widespread, devastating life effects, including financial problems, ruined relationships and friendships, even serious accidents and health risks. The collateral damage linked to alcoholism can be high, and the struggle to overcome it can seem never ending. You must take responsibility for your own recovery, and recognize that each day without a drink is a victory. With healthy coping methods for the triggers and situations you can’t control, and patience and determination for the physical cravings, your recovery from alcoholism will be less of a struggle, and more of a journey.

At The Springboard Center, we know that you and your family need a treatment provider you can trust. Incorporating the best of practices we have created a meaningful program to restore health and dignity with quality care and counseling. Call us today for information on how we are serving the Permian Basin: (432) 620-0255

How to Start and Maintain Healthy Habits

How to Start and Maintain Healthy Habits

One of the most important steps in treatment for drug or alcohol addiction is to start developing healthy habits in all aspects of your life. Your addiction has most likely caused health problems, ranging from poor diet to serious issues like liver failure or heart problems from drug use. It wreaks havoc on your body, mind and spirit, and in order to set yourself up for success after treatment, you have to start working on good habits to replace the old ones that led you here.

Sometimes, the easiest way to get started is just to simply do it. No, you may not really want to start getting up earlier every day, for example, but if it’s important that you start making more time in your day so you’re not rushed or stressed to avoid the possible trigger, sometimes you have to embrace Nike, and just do it. Try it for at least ten days, whether you’re pumped about it or not, and if you notice a difference, chances are you’re going to start enjoying that extra thirty minutes or an hour in the mornings.

It’s important to work towards habits that are maintainable for you; if you’ve never enjoyed running, don’t try to force yourself to pick up the habit of running several miles a day. If you don’t enjoy some of these habits you should be working towards, you won’t keep them up. Don’t start to blow more money than you can afford on trying to keep up with what you want for these habits, either.  If you want to start eating better, it can start with just swapping out high sugar foods or drinking more water. You don’t need to buy a new skillet set or expensive knives to have a good foundation for a healthier meal. Be more mindful of your ingredients instead. By not allowing yourself to go overboard too quickly, you’re not putting a ton of pressure on yourself that could potentially be a trigger.

It’s good to make plans and lists of goals and habits you’d like to have, but in order to get those habits and keep them up, you have to start somewhere. Even if it’s something you may not enjoy, but could benefit you, it’s worth it to just try it out, even for only ten days, and see if it makes a difference for you.

At The Springboard Center, we know that you and your family need a treatment provider you can trust. Incorporating the best of practices we have created a meaningful program to restore health and dignity with quality care and counseling. Call us today for information on how we are serving the Permian Basin: (432) 620-0255

How Do I Let Go of the Story of My Past When My Family and Friends are Still Angry?

How Do I Let Go of the Story of My Past When My Family and Friends are Still Angry?

When you’re in recovery following an addiction to drugs or alcohol, in order to move forward with your life in a honest, healthy way, you have to learn to let go of your past. All of your choices, behaviors, what you said and what you did, as truly terrible as some of those things may have been, they’re just that: in the past. Nothing you do or say about it could possibly change it now, and if you continually beat yourself up about it, the only thing you’ll accomplish is that you’ll push yourself into a darker place. Your past doesn’t need to define your future, and letting go of what you’ve done to move forward is key. This can be extremely difficult, however. Just because we’re at a point in our recovery that we feel we can forgive ourselves and try to move forward doesn’t mean the people around us are.

People who battle addiction often do and say horrible things to family and friends in order to get money or drugs. The effects of withdrawal or the substances themselves can cause people to lash out when they normally would have shown restraint. Addiction can cause rifts within families that last for decades, and it can shatter lifelong friendships. The people we love the most are often the most affected during addiction, and when the dust has settled after we begin treatment, they’re often left to pick up the pieces alone. This tends to make people bitter, and bitterness can linger for years.

If your friends or family are struggling to let go of the past, they have every right. Your actions and choices, while they are yours, affect the people around you in ways you may not even be aware of, and they have a right to feel hurt and angry over what’s happened. When you find that they are unwilling to even talk things out, or attempt to communicate how they feel, you may need to respect that, and give them time.

As hard as it can be, you can’t force people to move on before they’re ready. You have to give them time, and wait. Some people may never be able to move on, and there’s nothing you can do about that. Learning to let go of the fact that some people may never let go will help set you free.

At The Springboard Center, we know that you and your family need a treatment provider you can trust. Incorporating the best of practices we have created a meaningful program to restore health and dignity with quality care and counseling. Call us today for information on how we are serving the Permian Basin: (432) 620-0255

Learning to Manage Stress at Work

Learning to Manage Stress at Work

Stress affects billions of people around the world, and our jobs are often the culprit. Stress related to work is one of the most common reasons people struggle with sleep, and it can have a major impact on both your home and work life. Whether it’s your to-do list, a boss that makes life miserable both on the clock and off, even the risk of losing valuable health insurance or the position itself, stress can have serious repercussions. One of the most common triggers that can lead to cravings or even relapse for those battling an addiction is stress. This is especially true for people who work in a high pressure job or work environment. If you’re in recovery from addiction, and you’re struggling with stress at work, it’s important to manage stress at work, to keep your recovery off the clock and your career intact.

Luckily, there is a wide variety of ways that you can manage stress at work. With effort, you can take back your life from the pressure at work.

Seek out support from family or coworkers – you can be around your coworkers more than your family at times, and if you’re buckling under the pressure of stress at work, it’s important to know when to reach out.

Know what’s causing your stress – you can only address a problem or a stressor when you’re willing to find out what it is, or face it. It’s important to keep from burying your head and simply avoiding the situation.

Learn how to manage it – try as you might, stress at work can’t be avoided at times. Learning how to juggle your schedule with unexpected meetings, last minute deadlines and other issues stressing you out is key. Adapt if you need to, to find a way to manage it.

Revamp your lifestyle – a poor diet and a lack of exercise often make us feel even worse when we’re stressed out. Taking time to focus on exercise and a healthy lifestyle outside of the office will help you feel better, making it easier to deal with stress as it comes.

Work related stress is almost impossible to avoid entirely. Letting stress from work, or any stress, affect your physical or mental health can be a slippery slope for those recovering from addiction. It’s important both for the sake of your health and your career that you find healthy ways to deal with the stress that comes with your job, rather than turning once again to a substance to ease your tensions.

 

At The Springboard Center, we know that you and your family need a treatment provider you can trust. Incorporating the best of practices we have created a meaningful program to restore health and dignity with quality care and counseling. Call us today for information on how we are serving the Permian Basin: (432) 620-0255

How Can I Let Go of the Story of My Past?

How Can I Let Go of the Story of My Past?

The past can haunt us. Mistakes, choices we wish we hadn’t made, our actions and the things we said are all examples of things from the past that can keep a person up at night. Even the most successful, most outwardly positive people have regrets in life, most likely, and depending on what exactly is in a person’s past, it can be a heavy burden to bear. If you’re in recovery from drugs or alcohol addiction, this can be especially true; many people battling addiction find themselves doing things and crossing lines they never imagined they would have to get money, drugs or alcohol. When trying to move forward in a healthy, honest life, it can be hard to let go of your past.

That’s the key, though. The past is exactly that – past. It’s already happened and gone by, and as hard as it can be to accept, nothing that we do or say now can have an effect on that. We simply have to accept that it’s too late to change what’s already happened. Everyone in life makes mistakes, and as terrible as some of those choices and mistakes are, there’s not a point in beating yourself up over it. Being too hard on yourself now won’t do anything but damage your self esteem, which can set you up to make more bad choices. It’s good to have remorse for your choices and actions, especially if they had a negative impact on friends or family, but wallowing in regret will get you nowhere.

Facing your past is an important part of letting it go. If you’re always running from your past choices, you’re failing to own up to your own mistakes. You have to take responsibility for your past, even if it hurts, so that you can forgive yourself enough to let it go. If you’re not willing to take ownership of your choices and forgive yourself, why would anyone else? To err is human, but forgiving is part of being human as well, and that starts with yourself.

The past can feel like an anchor, dragging you under a wave of shame and regret for past actions and decisions. If you allow your past to define your present, your future may not be much different. What matters is your ability to move forward and make the choices that will help you live a long, healthy, clean life.

At The Springboard Center, we know that you and your family need a treatment provider you can trust. Incorporating the best of practices we have created a meaningful program to restore health and dignity with quality care and counseling. Call us today for information on how we are serving the Permian Basin: (432) 620-0255

Pets and Addiction - 4 Ways Addiction Affects our Furry Friends

Pets and Addiction – 4 Ways Addiction Affects our Furry Friends

Addiction is a disease that can leave an incredible amount of pain and destruction in its wake. Families are torn apart, friendships shattered, and marriages crumble. There’s no shortage of stories from former addicts about the chaos addiction brought to their lives, and how it impacted their friends, family and coworkers as much as it affected them in many cases. What’s far understated, however, is the impact addiction has on our pets. That’s right: your dog, cat, bird, reptile, or just about any pet you could imagine is affected by your addiction in more ways than you may realize, and it’s almost more devastating to come to this realization because our sweet companions don’t understand what’s happening.

Listed below are four major ways your pets are affected when you struggle with addiction:

  1. Not being fed – When someone struggles with an addiction, chances are their finances are a wreck. Money is flowing out the door for drugs or alcohol, and not much else. That means pets aren’t being fed if their owner isn’t buying them food.
  2. No access to clean water – When you’re stoned out of your mind, you’re not going to remember to fill up the water bowl regularly. Most pets simply sit with a completely dry bowl, waiting for their owner to stop getting high and care for them because they don’t have a choice.
  3. No proper medical care – This ties back into the first one. If there’s money problems, chances are if a pet gets hurt or becomes ill, their owner won’t be able to afford the care they need for their pet.
  4. Simple neglect – By and large, our pets want to be around us, they enjoy interacting with us and having our attention. When we’re under the influence of drugs or alcohol, we’re not capable of giving them the attention and love they deserve.

The animals we keep as pets are often bright spots of joy in our lives. We love them and they love us, but when addiction has a hold on you, that bond can be forever altered. Pets are among the most innocent victims in addiction, simply because they didn’t choose to be brought into the house of someone struggling with an addiction. They have no control over their situation. If you’ve been battling addiction to drugs or alcohol, if nothing else motivates you to try and get yourself help, think about that sweet dog you have, who would probably like nothing more than to simply go on a walk.

 

At The Springboard Center, we know that you and your family need a treatment provider you can trust. Incorporating the best of practices we have created a meaningful program to restore health and dignity with quality care and counseling. Call us today for information on how we are serving the Permian Basin: (432) 620-0255

Can You Use Any Drug Casually?

Can You Use Any Drug Casually?

There’s a constant debate about whether or not a person can use any drug casually. Whether it’s heroin, meth, marijuana or prescription drugs, some people insist that they can be a casual user of any kind of drug without suffering the effects of addiction or withdrawal. While this may be true in the case of marijuana and certain prescription drugs, those substances are often a gateway to using a harder substance or more frequent use that can be unhealthy. Those harder substances, like meth, crack, powdered cocaine, heroin and prescription opioids like Fentanyl, are known for having a high addiction rate. Heroin especially is known to get people who use it addicted within the first few uses.

Not every person will get addicted to the same substances with the same use, however. Everyone’s body handles drugs and alcohol differently, and the same amount of a drug that may get someone addicted with multiple uses won’t be the same for someone else. Because of how much variation there is in what will be addicting for different people, it’s extremely difficult to say if any one person can use a drug casually.

A big part of what it boils down to, however, is the person in question and their self control, restraint or ability to say no to themselves. If you have an incredible amount of self control, then it’s very possible that you can use certain substances occasionally and not feel the effects of addiction, but it’s extremely rare that a person can resist the urge to use again after the rush of euphoria most drugs provide. Unless you have absolute confidence in your ability to say no, your willpower or your non-addictive personality traits, it’s safe to assume that you’ll struggle with trying to remain a casual user before you spiral into daily use and addiction. Even if you believe you can do it, is it really worth the potential cost? All it takes is just one more use of the drug than you planned on that week, or finding yourself automatically reaching for a pipe or needle or pill the next day because you’re itching for that high again, and drugs have their claws in you.

While it may be technically possible to be a casual drug user, you’re not free from the side effects of using. Even occasional use over a long period of time can have serious consequences for your health, and the risk of spinning out into addiction outweighs the ‘fun’ you think you’re having.

At The Springboard Center, we know that you and your family need a treatment provider you can trust. Incorporating the best of practices we have created a meaningful program to restore health and dignity with quality care and counseling. Call us today for information on how we are serving the Permian Basin: (432) 620-0255

Are all Opioid Users at Risk for Addiction?

Are all Opioid Users at Risk for Addiction?

Right now, one of the most serious health problems in the United States is skyrocketing rate of opioid addiction. Anything from prescription pain medication to pure heroin or Fentanyl on the streets is being consumed in alarming amounts across the nation. More people than ever are dying from drug overdose due to dealers starting to mix things like heroin and Fentanyl, making it nearly impossible to take a small enough dose to not have a major impact on your health. While this rise in opioid addictions is frightening to say the least, does this mean that anyone who takes a legally prescribed opioid, like a painkiller after a back injury, is at risk for addiction?

In a way, yes.  Whether it’s legally prescribed or purchased on a street corner, any consumption of any opioid runs the risk of getting your body hooked, especially if you’re taking pain killers over a long period of time. All it can take is one hit or one pill too many, and you’re suddenly swimming in addiction. In America, opioids are vastly overprescribed, which has helped fuel the fire, but many of these prescriptions were justified or necessary for that person after a major injury or medical procedure. In some cases, teens steal their parents’ prescriptions, or someone may take one from an elderly friend or family member. There’s no shortage of ways to get the drugs these days.

This doesn’t mean that every person who takes an opioid pain killer is going to become addicted, however. Yes, there’s a risk that raises with each use of the drug, but like all addictions, a large part of whether or not a person become addicted has to do with more than just their body. Family history, previous issues with mental health or depression, even prior issues with drug or alcohol use are all other common examples of additional factors to take into account. If you have a family member that has struggled with an addiction in the past, there’s a chance you’ve inherited or picked up some of their less-than-ideal habits, and you could be putting yourself at risk for addiction if you don’t keep a leash on your use.

If you’re in pain and need pain killers, by all means, talk to your doctor about what’s best for you, but always keep in mind that you could be putting yourself at risk for addiction down the road if you have prolonged use.

At The Springboard Center, we know that you and your family need a treatment provider you can trust. Incorporating the best of practices we have created a meaningful program to restore health and dignity with quality care and counseling. Call us today for information on how we are serving the Permian Basin: (432) 620-0255

Addiction at the Top: Struggling as a CEO

Addiction at the Top: Struggling as a CEO

As the CEO of a company, you’re supposed to have all the answers, or at least know the people with the answers. You’re the head honcho, the leader of the pack, and if you’re a good one, a lot of people look up to you. That’s a lot of pressure, on top of running a company, and when you’re battling an addiction to drugs or alcohol, that added pressure can push you towards the edge, and seem unbearable.

There’s a good chance the pressures of your job or it’s impact on your home life is one of the reasons you started using the substance in question. Being in charge is tough. It’s the reason the President of the United States almost always goes grey haired within his first term. While you may not be running a country, your company is likely just as important to you. You may not be able to see it, but if you’re struggling to addiction, there’s a good chance it’s affecting your work performance. The longer an addiction goes on, the greater the impact it can have on your health, both physically and mentally.

There’s no shame in fighting an addiction. What’s important is the fight. It’s also just as important to know when to get help with your fight. It can be scary, and even potentially embarrassing. It could have major ramifications for your company, if it comes out that you need a drug or alcohol treatment program, and people  may not understand why you have a substance problem. It’s not their place to, luckily, and what would have an even more negative impact on your position and your company would be a failure to get help when you need it. Spiraling down will hurt you and everything you’ve worked for as a CEO, and it’s better to take the time and get treatment and ensure you protect yourself as much as your company than to try and keep it a secret.

As CEO, you have options to get help. The people around you want to see the company succeed, but they also want to see you succeed in treatment, so that you can keep leading the company. Don’t let fear of judgement keep you from getting help for your addiction to drugs or alcohol, and take the step to get into a treatment program.

At The Springboard Center, we know that you and your family need a treatment provider you can trust. Incorporating the best of practices we have created a meaningful program to restore health and dignity with quality care and counseling. Call us today for information on how we are serving the Permian Basin: (432) 620-0255

Are You Anxious or Stressed?

Are You Anxious or Stressed?

We’ve all experienced stressed in one way or another, whether it’s issues with family or work, or having to make a big decision. The stress from situations like these can feel overwhelming and unending, which can make it difficult to actually figure out how much stress we’re feeling, and why. When we’re stressed out about something, it’s not uncommon for phrases like “this is giving me anxiety” to slip out, and while we can often feel stressed and anxious at the same time, they’re actually two different conditions with distinct effects and causes.

Stress and anxiety share many of the same effects on the body. Whether you’re tense about a problem or deadline, or feeling anxious about something more, they both tend to lead to more rapid heart rates, muscle tension, and rapid breathing. A major difference is that anxiety can often give way to a full blown panic attack, which can bring on more severe levels of the previous symptoms, but in addition to chest pains, headaches, even hot flashes or chills. These can be difficult to overcome once they’ve begun, and the symptoms often compound as the person suffering from it gets overwhelmed by what they’re feeling and the fear that comes with it.

Stress is normally caused by something external. Bills, problems with children or upcoming deadlines are outside factors that are stressors for most people. While these can seem unbearable, they’re also things you can do something about. Tackling the things that are causing you stress is often the best way to manage it, and once the issue is resolved, the stress normally fades as well.

Anxiety, however, is not so easily managed. With stress, you can find what’s worrying you, but when it comes to anxiety, you’re not as aware of what you’re anxious about, but you gradually find yourself becoming anxious simply about being anxious. Phobias, especially those related to activities or social situations cause the person suffering from anxiety to often panic when they’re faced with that particular stressor. It tends to snowball from there, converting fear into a strong feeling and the people with anxiety begin to try to avoid the situation or event. It’s important to remember that you’re in control of your anxiety, and to remain present to what is, instead of what could be.

While anxiety and stress are very similar, it’s important to know the difference so that you can address it in the right way.

At The Springboard Center, we know that you and your family need a treatment provider you can trust. Incorporating the best of practices we have created a meaningful program to restore health and dignity with quality care and counseling. Call us today for information on how we are serving the Permian Basin: (432) 620-0255